Call Me by Your Name.

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME FEELS DIFFERENT AND FRESH, BUT NOT JUST BECAUSE IT’S A QUEER FILM.

First loves are the hardest to shake, as evidenced in the film’s closing moments. Never before has a movie treated an inevitable loss with such dignity and beauty, both through a stunning monologue delivered by Michael Stuhlbarg, who plays Elio’s father, and a final, several-minute-long shot of Elio’s face as he contemplates his summer romance and, surely, what it means for the future. We may know what happens next—Eliot will surely love again—but Guadagnino places the most importance on the present, an emotional limbo full of sadness and joy, grief and hope. It’s enough to erase all of the movies you’ve loved before, as it’s impossible not to feel seduced and broken by what Guadagnino pulls off. The film will leave you devastated, but the memory of its exuberant 130 minutes will last a lifetime.

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